Aer Lingus unveils brand refresh

Aer Lingus New Livery Photo by Aer Lingus

Aer Lingus unveiled yesterday a refreshed brand with updated logo and new aircraft livery.

The new logo retains but restyles the iconic shamrock, adding a tilt to symbolise dynamism and speed, with heart-shaped leaves reflecting the warmth and hospitality of the brand. Guests will see four shamrocks on the new Aer Lingus aircraft livery. The first is within the new logo, the second sits on the tailfin, a third welcomes guests at the door, and one on the wingtip.

The Aer Lingus logo font has changed to ‘diodrum’ and the dominant colour is teal. The body of the new look Aer Lingus aircraft will be white with a teal-coloured tail and engines, bringing a sleek, contemporary feel to the design. The teal undercarriage means that Aer Lingus will be instantly recognisable to those on the ground. The brand refresh is being rolled out across all brand platforms, with a new website design and new app design. It will be visible across all guest touchpoints, from check-in to boarding gate and on to the aircraft.

Image by Aer Lingus

The refresh is part of the airline’s ambitious growth plan which will see Aer Lingus increase its North Atlantic fleet from 17 to 30 aircraft by 2023. Overall, Aer Lingus plans to grow its A330 fleet to 16 aircraft (from 13 in 2017) and invest in 14 new A321LRs to provide capacity for growth across the Atlantic and within Europe.

The A330 (A330-300 series aircraft, EI-EDY, St Munchin) was unveiled at an event in Aer Lingus’ Hangar 6 at Dublin Airport (DUB), where it had been painted on-site. The A320 (A320-200 series aircraft, EI-CVA, St Schira.) flew from Shannon Airport (SNN), where it had been painted. The new liveried A330 aircraft will take to the skies for the first time on Friday 18 January, operating flight EI105, where it will be met by a reception in New York-John F. Kennedy (JFK).

Image by Aer Lingus

Creative agency Lippincott led the brand refresh project. The agency has extensive airline experience having most recently worked on Delta, Southwest, and Hawaiian airlines. They have worked extensively with Airbus and therefore have a deep understanding of all the complexities involved in designing for and painting an aircraft. The lead designer on this project was Dublin native Brendán Murphy who has been working with Lippincott in New York for over 20 years. More than 50 shamrock designs were considered as part of the brand refresh process.

Aer Lingus